Dating sites using fake profiles

07-Dec-2015 17:56

The scam typically works like this: A con artist, usually based in an Internet cafe overseas, will lift a photo from Facebook or another social networking site.

They will painstakingly craft a fake profile and begin targeting people that are looking for love.

The dating sites say any fake profiles have been set up by scammers, which they claim is an industry wide issue which they were working to combat.

Cupid, which had a revenue of £81million last year, maintained that the communications with profiles set up by the programme had been genuine, and explained that subscribers may receive fewer messages as “we promote them less broadly on the website to focus their attention on key messages".

The lesson here is that online dating startups will need to step up their game to keep consumers safe.

“In the war against online dating scams and security threats, we’ve chosen to do whatever is necessary to always be a few steps ahead of scammers, and not the other way around – which is usually too late for our users,” said Cupid.com’s CEO, Bill Dobbie.

Pictures, names, email addresses, dates of birth and detail of the sexual orientation of unsuspecting members of the public are being purchased by dating websites to create false profiles of attractive people, it has been claimed.

To identify rogue behavior, the algorithm factors in the user’s login location, IP address, profile photo, and behavior patterns.

Additionally, the system can detect “bots,” often operated by organized crime gangs, which create profiles and engage real members in automated scripted conversations designed to elicit payment.

Already, through its quality assurance methods, the site has identified 20,000 scammers who get permanently blocked from Cupid’s communities each month.

Here are some expert tips on avoiding scams from Cupid.com’s Communications director, Sean Wood: Word of caution: The FBI recently issued a warning about a different kind of online dating scam known as “ransomware.” It’s a virus that will make your computer inoperable until you hand over a payment. Have you ever been a victim of an online dating scam?

Pictures, names, email addresses, dates of birth and detail of the sexual orientation of unsuspecting members of the public are being purchased by dating websites to create false profiles of attractive people, it has been claimed.

To identify rogue behavior, the algorithm factors in the user’s login location, IP address, profile photo, and behavior patterns.

Additionally, the system can detect “bots,” often operated by organized crime gangs, which create profiles and engage real members in automated scripted conversations designed to elicit payment.

Already, through its quality assurance methods, the site has identified 20,000 scammers who get permanently blocked from Cupid’s communities each month.

Here are some expert tips on avoiding scams from Cupid.com’s Communications director, Sean Wood: Word of caution: The FBI recently issued a warning about a different kind of online dating scam known as “ransomware.” It’s a virus that will make your computer inoperable until you hand over a payment. Have you ever been a victim of an online dating scam?

' “I really object to someone taking advantage with people like that, using my photo." Another profile on the site, claiming to belong to a woman from Glasgow, was using an old photograph of Michelle Pfeiffer.