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18-Oct-2016 13:02

Few Late Woodland sites have been excavated in Arkansas, so little is known about subsistence in the state during this period.

The best-known Middle Woodland site in Arkansas was located at the southern end of Crowley’s Ridge in Helena (Phillips County), where a group of five burial mounds was once located.The Woodland period is a label used by archaeologists to designate pre-Columbian Native American occupations dating between roughly 600 BC and AD 1000 in eastern North America.This time period traditionally is divided into Early, Middle, and Late subperiods, which refer to intervals characterized in very general terms by the first widespread use of pottery across the region, the rise and then decline of a vast exchange network throughout eastern North America,and finally, a period of increasing agricultural intensification and population growth in many areas.Finally, in some regions, pottery predates the onset of Woodland cultures by over 1000 years.Early Woodland occupations, dating between about 600 and 200 BC, generally are recognized based on the common occurrence of pottery with distinctive designs or “surface treatments” on vessel exteriors.

The best-known Middle Woodland site in Arkansas was located at the southern end of Crowley’s Ridge in Helena (Phillips County), where a group of five burial mounds was once located.

The Woodland period is a label used by archaeologists to designate pre-Columbian Native American occupations dating between roughly 600 BC and AD 1000 in eastern North America.

This time period traditionally is divided into Early, Middle, and Late subperiods, which refer to intervals characterized in very general terms by the first widespread use of pottery across the region, the rise and then decline of a vast exchange network throughout eastern North America,and finally, a period of increasing agricultural intensification and population growth in many areas.

Finally, in some regions, pottery predates the onset of Woodland cultures by over 1000 years.

Early Woodland occupations, dating between about 600 and 200 BC, generally are recognized based on the common occurrence of pottery with distinctive designs or “surface treatments” on vessel exteriors.

Throughout Arkansas, plain surfaces are common; in the Mississippi River Valley, surface treatments include geometric motifs formed by individual cord-impressions, fabric marking, and cordmarking.