Radiometric dating lesson

08-Feb-2016 09:55

Also, recent catastrophes show that violent events like the flood described in Genesis could form many rock layers very quickly. Helens eruption in Washington state produced 25 feet (7.6 meters) of finely layered sediment in a And a rapidly pumped sand slurry was observed to deposit 3 to 4 feet (about 1 meter) of fine layers on a beach over an area the size of a football field.

Sedimentation experiments by the creationist Guy Berthault, sometimes working with non-creationists, have shown that fine layers can form by a self-sorting mechanism during the settling of differently sized particles.

However, a cataclysmic globe-covering (and fossil-forming) flood would have eroded huge quantities of sediment, and deposited them elsewhere.

Many organisms would have been buried very quickly and fossilized.

Great thicknesses could conceivably be produced either by a little water over long periods, or a lot of water over short periods.

presents what it claims is evidence for vast time spans.

Observation 1: Consider the English text of Psalm 42:1. There is no report by the psalmist that the deer (the King James Version uses “hart,” i.e., male deer) is actually chasing or even “pursuing” a freshwater stream. Waters flowing through the channeled banks of a brook do not try to flee, like a fugitive, from thirsty animals, so why would someone suggest that deer “pursue” the waters of a brook?

Observation 2: Because Psalms is, literarily speaking, an example of Hebrew poetry, its textual content is structured by parallelism in meaning. Theologically speaking, to say the deer pursue the water would portray God as if He were trying to escape from the psalmist and elude his grasp, i.e., as if the psalmist needed to “chase” after God. So why would the verb “pant” suggest pursuing to a human reader?

But, empirically speaking, do deer ever pursue stream water to drink? When deer drink stream water, they stand calmly in one place, with their heads bent down to lap up the water. Yet the overheated deer does pant as he or she yearns for cool drinking water. It is true that we are the “sheep” of God’s pasture (Psalm 100:3), and He is the good “shepherd” (John ).

Thus, it is good for us to follow our “great Shepherd of the sheep” (Hebrews ), but we don’t need to Him down to do so.

presents what it claims is evidence for vast time spans.

Observation 1: Consider the English text of Psalm 42:1. There is no report by the psalmist that the deer (the King James Version uses “hart,” i.e., male deer) is actually chasing or even “pursuing” a freshwater stream. Waters flowing through the channeled banks of a brook do not try to flee, like a fugitive, from thirsty animals, so why would someone suggest that deer “pursue” the waters of a brook?

Observation 2: Because Psalms is, literarily speaking, an example of Hebrew poetry, its textual content is structured by parallelism in meaning. Theologically speaking, to say the deer pursue the water would portray God as if He were trying to escape from the psalmist and elude his grasp, i.e., as if the psalmist needed to “chase” after God. So why would the verb “pant” suggest pursuing to a human reader?

But, empirically speaking, do deer ever pursue stream water to drink? When deer drink stream water, they stand calmly in one place, with their heads bent down to lap up the water. Yet the overheated deer does pant as he or she yearns for cool drinking water. It is true that we are the “sheep” of God’s pasture (Psalm 100:3), and He is the good “shepherd” (John ).

Thus, it is good for us to follow our “great Shepherd of the sheep” (Hebrews ), but we don’t need to Him down to do so.

Sedimentary rocks sometimes contain fossils formed from the parts of organisms deposited along with other solid materials.